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#245529 - Mon Apr 04 2011 11:44 PM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Thunder II]
Bob Richards Offline
Veteran Member

Registered: Tue Feb 22 2005
Loc: Longview, WA
Not sure about today's products, which one's will become collectible.

But, I do believe the hobby will be a strong winner for the younger collectors. As the "baby boomers" head for their last roundup there is going to be a lot of items coming on the market that has been squirreled away in people's collections.

It will be like the hobby is starting all over again. And as these items see the light of day again, the marketplace will establish their values.
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#245539 - Tue Apr 05 2011 12:40 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Thunder II]
Gaspedler Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Sun Feb 04 2001
Loc: Lebanon, Indiana. USA
I think 30 years from now the same rules will apply as they do today.

What is valuable? The things that were thrown away, because no one saved them.

You mentioned oil bottles with labels that fade and peal. In time I think those will change form. To what I don't know. But, I think they will find a collectable value in the future. If you can find a way to preserve them.

Small items like oil cans, and small signs will hold their value, because they are easy to display in Apartments and Condo's.

Working for one of the Major Oil Companies, I have stuff pass thru my hands that I couldn't get a "plug" nickle for. I toss it in a box, not for me, but for my grandsons, in the hope it may be of value for them. Even the boxes you got a plug nickle from are getting scarce....
Historically items with multiple company names demand a higher value than items with just one of the names on it. The Marathon / Ashland venture only lasted 5 years, and still so new those items don't bring much at all, but in time I think they will, maybe not my time.

The Gimme's are still out there, but getting rare. Some stores still do limited promotions. And today many are not free, but they are still promotional items put out in limited quantities.

I think 40 years from now my grandsons will say, "Hey look, my grandpa had one of those, I want that!" Just like it drives so many people to start collecting today.

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#245541 - Tue Apr 05 2011 01:04 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Thunder II]
Jack Sim Offline
Veteran Member

Registered: Fri Nov 10 2000
Loc: St. Louis, MO, USA
To answer Thunder's question "What is available today?", the next time you go to your local C-Store (that is what the industry call them), park on the side and walk around and take a look. The pumps take up the complete island, a little too big to put next to your restored 2001 car (20 years from now); signs, besides a few up there on the canopy, there aren't any; inside, nothing, I guess you could collect Twinkie packages.

So what is this 76 year old guy trying to say? When I came into this hobby from the car collecting hobby it didn't seem much different, we collected what we remembered, and at my age I remember buying gasoline from a visible pump. I owned service stations that had attendents, sold oil at the island, put air in people's tires, but this is all gone. When it comes to Petroliana, there is nothing today I would purchase to hang on my garage wall.

Do I have any advice, I would reread Dan's post above, he pretty well hit the nail on the head, he sees more things changing hands in one year than we might see in 10 years.

One other thing, Ebay and any on-line auction has completly changed how things are exchanged. At one time if you found a 1910 National Geo. mag. you could sell it for $20.00 to $30.00, now you can't hardly get $.50 for it, why, because Ebay has emptied every basement that had NGs in it, the supply has exceded the demand. The same thing is happening with our hobby when it comes to maps, smalls and handy oilers.

Said enough,

Jack Sim
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Author, Gas Pump Identfication books 1st & 2nd Editions & Air Meter Identification books
We rebuild ECO air meters and sell parts.

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#245545 - Tue Apr 05 2011 03:55 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Jack Sim]
lordparaffin Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Tue Mar 23 2004
Loc: Sunbury, PA, USA
And that's the trick......everyone here has some thought or idea on what from today will be collectible but there is no unified concensus. If we knew that in advance, we'd all save the same things and to be quite honest there would be no future because everything would always be in plentiful demand. You could drive yourself nuts trying to figure out the ebb and flow of how and where things will go but it just evolves naturally on it's own with no real rhyme or reason at times. I guarantee that things will be collected---by SOMEONE! Just what is anybodies guess. And I respectfully disagree with Jack. Take a look around, use your imagination and you'd be surprised at what possibilties emerge. I think todays pumps are yes, large, but some of the big display units of yesteryear and the giant towering visibles that can't always be fit in your home are no less intimidating in size. Todays generations are into these little 4 bangers and they even have a term for them......TUNERS. Todays' little buzz mufflers all decked out in neon lighting under the car with all the latest spoilers will look quite at home with todays multi-payment option, moving screen, coupon spitting, computer ladden pumps we see and use everyday. Technology along technology.......IT'S ALL RELATIVE!


Edited by lordparaffin (Tue Apr 05 2011 03:57 AM)
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........Dave
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Looking for old, rare, auto light bulb tins

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#245546 - Tue Apr 05 2011 04:32 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: lordparaffin]
tyler Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Mon Jan 31 2011
Loc: Willowbrook, Il
Sounds like you got it dave. Although im young, I like the stuff thats old now, but I also like old cars. It just wouldnt right to have an 01 civic with a 36b next to it. Yes the pumps now days are big, but so are some of the old coke chests ( heavy too ) yet some still collect those. And as far as signs, I think it will be hard in 30 years to find any super nice signs that are hanging now, most all will have damage since everything is plastic. As for smalls, the only thing my local mobil gives out is blanc match books.

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#245579 - Tue Apr 05 2011 09:32 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: tyler]
Craig Osbeck Online   content
Veteran Member

Registered: Tue Jan 06 2009
Loc: Portland Oregon
Collect what you like and someone will see it and the way you have it presented. If they like it, they will also appreciate it and possibly remember and want it. So driving the need or want to collect and display better or just to have. Promoting the capitalism event of making something more valuable just because someone else wants it.

Possible of any item that is out there now for future children of all ages.
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Craig

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#245585 - Tue Apr 05 2011 10:00 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Thunder II]
cormy Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Mon Feb 09 2004
Loc: PA
I have thought about this and come to the conclusion most of the stuff we have and covent now will have no demand or much worth in the years to come.

"collect what you like" is a nice thing to say.. but I don't think there is any one collector out there that doesn't think of reselling there stuff or as an investment for the future.

This is the reason I have stopped buying the older oil stuff in general (30's - 50's) and am concentrating on more modern "collectibles" that I can enjoy now but will have some value in 10-20 years from now..and its not gas/oil stuff.

I think the huge collector with the really old gas stuff is going to be out alot of money if they don't unload their stuff within the next 10-15 years, young adults today don't give a s*** about this stuff since they have no concept of it.

I wish this wasn't the case because I think the old stuff is great but have to deal with the reality of generations to come and don't want to be stuck "holding the bag" so to speak.

Don't want to sound negative and of course I could be wrong..it's the way I see it.

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#245587 - Tue Apr 05 2011 10:06 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Craig Osbeck]
eric grinder Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Fri May 21 2010
Loc: MA
I know this is a little off subject but I often wonder where the future of this great hobby wil go as well. I am 35 and got head over heels hooked after I saw some signs at a swap meet a few years ago. I thought it would be great to have one hanging in the garage. Well just a few short years later I have 10 pumps and not a square ft on my walls. Prices right now are super super strong but let me ask you. As the years go by and the collectors out there that remember all this stuff from their era pass on, who will really be left to collect this stuff. I know from the shows and meets I attend here in NE I am the youngest by far! In my opinion if new younger members dont join the hobby in 30 years when most of us have passed it will be uncertain at best.
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Mainly focused on Oilzum, Jenney, Harris Oil items & original paint gas pumps.

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#245591 - Tue Apr 05 2011 10:14 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: eric grinder]
KZ1000 Offline
Veteran Member

Registered: Sun Oct 21 2007
Loc: Mass
Not to worry, Any EARLY sign will NEVER lose it's value, a few on this site collect what they remember seeing. But most here and collectors around the world will always be collecting the oldest stuff around, whether it is Gas and Oil or Furniture. Future collectors will not pass on an early Oilzum Porcelain sign because they don't remeber seeing one. in 20 years it is going to be even older than it is now, and therefore probably worth even more.
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"Remember, history that is forgotten is doomed to repeat itself!"

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#245600 - Tue Apr 05 2011 10:40 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: KZ1000]
eric grinder Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Fri May 21 2010
Loc: MA
KZ I am sure your right, the old rare stuff now will be even rarer then. It's amazing some of the stuff that is still out in the wild thats being saved every day now. Those finds will be far and fewer in 20 years.
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Mainly focused on Oilzum, Jenney, Harris Oil items & original paint gas pumps.

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#245604 - Tue Apr 05 2011 10:47 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: KZ1000]
Maps for the memories Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Thu Jul 06 2006
Loc: Midwest
Just my opinion, but I think pre-Interstate era road maps will keep their value. If you scan around on Google Earth, it's great fun to find old roadbeds, but you need the old map to confirm what you're seeing.
I do think houses will be built smaller, decreasing storage space for larger items. I also think the era of the restaurant with nostalgic decor is fading away. People who remember the '50s, as this is the era that sort of restaurant favors, are in their late 60s.
Items I'm pretty sure will keep their value include "arty" porcelain signs, giveaway pens, pencils, and matches, globes, original photos, and hopefully maps.

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#245621 - Tue Apr 05 2011 11:56 AM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Maps for the memories]
BIGTOM Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Fri Feb 04 2011
Loc: Clay Center, KS
This is the era of throw away. NOTHING that is made of that cheap thin petroleum based plastic will survive. Stick that thin, Chinese made plastic sign in the window and in 6 months it is dried out, cracked and too brittle to do anything with. Additionally, today's advertising artwork cant hold a candle to the artwork that was used on the original signs - in my opinion, this artwork is from a bygone era and will be looked at as art (because it is) right alongside the Art Deco stuff. The pumps will also be of interest - not as much as the classic cars, but they will be right there with them.

Today's stuff is junk and made to be tossed away within a year or two - think about it guys; TVs, appliances, stereos even cars... NONE are meant to be repaired, just replaced. There isn't a chance in heck that any of the cars that we are driving right now will be classics - what on these paper thin bodies will survive? The chrome plated plastic? The body panels that you can dent when you lean your butt onto them? The computer brains which never seem to work right? Nope - it's all junk. I keep telling my wife that instead of a new car, I want to spend 25k on a classic that was made to withstand the test of time - she just shakes her head and looks at me like I am crazy.

Everything that was made in this hobby was meant to be repaired and meant to last. If it wasn't - it wouldn't be here today.

Im pretty passionate about this stuff too as I am pretty new to the hobby and I want to see it last for a while. I am not worried about it and for those of you who are worried - liquidate your collections to those of us who are true believers.

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#245645 - Tue Apr 05 2011 02:27 PM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Thunder II]
jackofalltrades Offline
Petro Enthusiast

Registered: Tue Jan 04 2011
Loc: West Michigan
....what will be collectible in the future? Here's my $.02

1) The unique or rare (less common). 2) Eye-pleasing (not ugly). 3) Can be used later or repurposed.

If you buy an item that meets more than one criteria, you increase the chance of it being collectible.

Yesteryear examples: round top coke machines (meets 1,2&3), jukeboxes (meets 1,2&3), pinball machines (meets 1,2&3), certain muscle cars (meets 1,2&3), etc, etc.

The modern items everyone thinks will be collectible will not be. Too many will get saved, so they won't become rare. We need a generation to go by that throws it all out, then once it becomes a trend or style, we pull out a few we "collected".

I also have the answer to the meaning of life, what stocks will be hot, what the economy will do, etc :-)

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#245672 - Tue Apr 05 2011 06:32 PM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: jackofalltrades]
Thunder II Offline
Veteran Member

Registered: Fri Jan 20 2006
Loc: On the plains of Colorado
Please allow me to restate the question.... And allow me to clarify myself. I'm not asking about the youth, or future collectors. I'm not asking about, what is hot now, or will be in the future. Or what is a good investment... So here goes.

The other day I saw a tv commercial about GPS navigation systems. I was thinking, that with these things, road maps will soon be a thing of the past. Kinda like the way cell phones have pretty much eliminated pay phones. With this thought, old oil cans and greases cans, made of metal, could have been washed out and re-used for nuts & bolts, ect. Service stations, would have gifts for their customers, and their employees would wear uniforms. The gas pumps, were of Art deco designs, or stylish, smooth, streamlined shapes, with globes..... Are ya followin' me?

With none of these things available now, or slowly being phased out, or made of cheap plastic or cardboard which has no real life expectancy, or pumps of nothing more than flat panel designs......

WHAT, if anything, will there be to collect? Hence my question, "What is the future of the Hobby?"
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Anything Chevron

I'd rather be flying.....

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#245674 - Tue Apr 05 2011 06:57 PM Re: What is the future of the hobby? [Re: Thunder II]
KZ1000 Offline
Veteran Member

Registered: Sun Oct 21 2007
Loc: Mass
Your a tough man to please. And if you get mad at me I'll sell you another bike part.
_________________________
"Remember, history that is forgotten is doomed to repeat itself!"

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