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Author Topic:   COTM: STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
Gary Drye
Active Member

Posts: 1208
From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 09-01-2005 03:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message


STOLL OIL REFINING CO.

PRELUDE

This month's COTM will be quite different from the normal facts and dates seen previously in COTM. This is a look at history through the person that was a major part of our history. I think some obscure facts and tidbits will provide some of you with enjoyment and some previously unknown facts may come to light.

A few months ago, I was contacted by a Carolyn Stoll Bolt of Sarasota, Florida. Her Great Grandfather was Charles Christian Stoll, founder of the company and she was seeking information. Very little is known of the company and I dug into my reference books to accommodate her. Being a smaller regional oil company, all the available information was about the same. "Stoll Oil was founded in Louisville, Ky. in 1896 and bought out by Sinclair in 1952. All rebranding to Sinclair was completed by 1956." This would have normally summed up my article for Company of the Month if not for what Carolyn was about to provide me with. Soon packets of information started to arrive including C.C.'s personal journal. What I found was an amazing insight into the very early years of the oil industry.

Intellegence, intuition, integrity. These traits are not now found in top level corporate managements and certainly not in the petroleum industry. But Charles Christian Stoll (1861-1943) exhibited all of these and more. This was the era of the Standard Oil Trust and John D. Rockefeller, but I'm getting ahead of myself. Let me start from the very beginning.


THE STANDARD OIL TRUST & CHESS CARLEY YEARS 1881-1896

Born April 23, 1861 in Louisville, Ky., Charles Christian Stoll (referred to as C.C. from this point on) had the "normal" childhood for his time. Upon graduating in the top of his class in 1880, he was emplyeed by Chess Carley Oil Company of Nashville, Tn. in 1881 as a bookkeeper. His education of the oil industry business was beginning. It is common knowledge of John Rockefeller's Standard Oil Trust's business practices and how they dominated the world's oil market. Little did I know that Standard "allowed" some oil companies, known as "agents" to flourish...as long as they were loyal to Standard. Chess Carley was one of these companies in the South.

Chess Carley Oil Company was based upon the destruction of any Standard Oil competition. The plan of operation "aimed to secure a monopoly and bring forth under control of the Standard Oil Company, all petroleum refining/marketing, etc." In these early days there were very few independent oil refineries. C.C. recalls only one, Geo Rice of Marietta, Ohio as a "thorn in the flesh" for Chess Carley in the South. Mr. Carley issued a monthy small pamphlet called "Black Death". Printed in yellow and black colors with a large skull and crossbones on the cover. In these phamphlets are the unfair methods employed by the railroads in connection with Chess Carley and Standard Oil. He printed many letters from customers complaining how the arrival of a carload from Geo Rice resulted in a drop in the selling price to a point below cost and asking Mr. Rice what he could do about it. C.C. is quoted many years later "I deeply regret not to have kept some of these issues for they stirred in those of us employed by the Big Company a feeling of shame and unfairness and that feeling grew with the years".

C.C. made out claims against the L&N (louisville/Nashville) Railroad for Standard Oil on shipments made by the competitors. The shipping rate for kerosene in carloads of wooden barrels was $1 per barrel for the competitor, 50 cents per barrel to Standard. Then the railroad paid the competition's extra 50 cents to Standard. The rate of a tankcar of petroleum from Louisville to Atlanta was $107 per car. Twice that for the competition.

C.C. was also now in charge of the "competitive statements" for the "Kentucky". These monthy reports were known as the "W.E. Bemis Reports". These were forwarded to Mr. bemis at his New York office. Selling prices were based on the amount of competition in the market. "We were suppose to know and report the receipt of all competitive oil in our 10 states". Special "station agents" were employed and it was their duty to report, often by wire, the arrival of any competitive oil in his territory, giving all details, shipper's name, point shipped from, etc. Usually, of course, the price at that location dropped. Usually to a point that would give loss and discourage that merchant from dealing in competitive oils.

In 1883, C.C. was transferred back to the main office in Louisville as part of Standard Oil of Kentucky. He was one of the 5 or 6 who sat around the "Big Table" considering changes in pricing. These were the days when kerosene or coal oil was the chief product and the tank wagon was just beginning to make its appearance for deliveries. The gasoline motor had not yet appeared and gasoline was a byproduct and difficult to dispose of. So C.C. was surprised one day when a close associate of John D. Rockefeller approached him asking if he could not stir up some orders for him for gasoline as he was burning gasoline under his boilers at the Standard Refinery in Parkersburg, Pa.

Another marketing technique construed by Mr. Carley about 1884 was what he called the "Circuit System". It consisted of building in 10 or 12 small towns a small warehouse in each. They would be just large enough to hold a carload of 60 barrels of kerosene. One salesman would be in charge of that "circuit'. C.C. was delegated to organize the first circuit in Mississippi. He selected the towns with Meridian as headquarters. As soon as the system was built, a "circuit rider" was to take charge. Columbus was one of these towns and Mr. Carley's idea was not going well. It seemed that there was a local grocery store that resisted selling Chess Carley products. They were told if they persisted with this attitude, the Chess Carley Company would go into the grocery business, undercut their pricing and put them out of business. After being rebuked again, the oil company constructed a grocery store right next to the local merchant and immediately cut pricing well below the original store's goods. Chess Carley should have known better as the town citizens took up the fight. The public was aroused by such unfairness and their sympathy was with the local merchant. The result was inevitable as the oil company's store could not sell goods at any price and eventually closed, along with their potential oil sales.It was into this mess that C.C. was sent to make amends and get Columbus back into the "circuit". C.C's diplomatic side emerged as he took out public apologies in the newspaper and did some politicing. He finally pursuaded the city council to reissue the necessary permits for business.

The Chess Carley Company was completely absorbed by Standard Oil in 1886, the same year C.C. married. When he and his new bride left on their wedding trip, he was employed by Chess Carley. Upon his return home, he was an employee of Standard Oil Of Kentucky. While the Standard Oil co. was very kind to C.C. he was not happy in his work. "The ruthless methods, the unfairness of the Bemis Reports, which I personally make regularly, weigh heavily upon me".

Thes methods of unfairness were exposed by Miss Ida Tarbell. Her brother was an officer in one of the larger Pa. oil companies not associated with Standard. She was able to obtain detailed and reliable information. The magazine "Everybody" ran a monthy serial on the misdeeds of the Standard Oil monopoly. It created a tremendous sensation in the land and resulted in the tightening of the laws. Under the instigation of Theodore Rooselvelt as President, the Federal Gov't brought suit against the Standard Oil Trust. in 1911, Judge Landis from the Federal Bench in Chicago address a fine of $29,000,000 and ordered the company dismembered and put back into its original 33 corporations.

Being a very religious man and active in community life, the business practices C.C. was subjected to were finally taking their toll. In late 1895 or early '96, word came that the General Office of Standard of Ky. would be moved from Louisville to Cincinnat. This directly affected C.C. and finally gave him the opportunity he seeked...Resignation.Mr. E.L. Goodwin, VP of the "Kentucky" tried to persuade C.C. into staying, even relaying a large promotion that was to be his. The Company's ruthless marketing methods were frankly discussed and when Goodwin realized he could not change C.C.'s mind, he asked what he would do. "The only business I know is the oil business". C.C replied. Goodwin stated, "You know that if you did that, the Standard Oil Co. would drop the price here in Louisville 4 cents per gallon and raise it in Chattanooga". "Yes, I know that and that is just the reason why I am quitting as I believe I prefer to be the underdog than to continue to harass the other fellow".

C.C.'s resignation was then forwarded to Mr. Charles W. Pratt in New York. C.C. was asked to report to the corporate N.Y. headquarters for an appointment with Mr. Pratt, which he did. After refusing several promotions and offers, the resignation was accepted. C.C was now on his own.

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Gary Drye
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Posts: 1208
From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 09-01-2005 03:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
Chas. C. Stoll Oil Co.

After his resignation from Standard Oil, C.C. envisioned his own oil company. Being short on cash, his only asset was his home. He had it appraised and refinanced. With cash in hand, he began looking to establish connections for crude oil and supplies. He visited Cleveland, Ohio where he established contacts with Schofield, Schumer & Teagle Oil Co. In Toledo, it was the Craig Oil Company and Paragon Refining Company. All independent refiners. He then traveled to Reno, Pa. and placed an order for a carload of engine cylinder oils with A.L. Confer Company. His next objective was for a business location. C.C. purchased some property in Louisville bordering the Ohio River for $2,000.

Knowing Standard Oils tactics, obtaining of permits and the construction had to be kept secret. The warehouse or "coopershop" was the first building erected, and about the time the roof was going on, Standard discovered C.C.'s intentions and "got busy". Soon an order from City Hall came for all construction to "desist". An error had been made in processing the permits! Work still continued with one worker "standing guard" watching for any approaching policeman. The work would stop until the policeman passed. After several days of work stoppage, C.C. called upon Henry Barker, the city attorny and "laid the whole case before him". With so much public resentment building against Standard Oil, the permits were reissued with good standing and work was completed.

To go head to head against Standard Oil took as much brain as guts and C.C. lacked neither. As this was a time before electricity, many versions of oil was used. One important usage was oil that was essential to the performance of incubators. Coal Oil lamps was another. To get a foothold into this market area, C.C. had quantities of metal "Solite" signs made for merchant use. Yearly contracts with country town weekly newspapers advertising Solite Oils and Roof paints were signed.

C.C. contracted with Globe Soap Company of Louisville to manufacture "Cottonbale Soap" which was purchased in carloads and sold in grocery stores everywhere. The colorful wrapper showed "an old colored woman at the washtub" and the wrapper had a jingle printed on it. It read, "Sing a song of Cottonbale, a whole tub full of suds...Old Aunt Dianah sings its praise while away she rubs...Cottonbale is just the thing for winter, summer, fall and spring....so why not buy a bar today and drive all care and dirt away". This diversification of products was needed when taking on Standard Oil. Even a monthy paper, the "Olite" was published and sent out freely to country traders. C.C. stated, "we talked in it as interesting as possible of our problem, of the importance of patronizing an independent oil company". Solite Oils also had their own jingles. Here are a couple. "So long a drop is in the urn, so long is Solite sure to burn." and "You may use old lamps and burners if you will, but Solite Oil will give a good light still".
The methods of Stoll Oil did not subject itself to the mercy of Standard Oil who fought hard on kerosene and stove gasoline. C.C. kept before his customers the unfairness of the competition and was able to get much business at his pricing."If our only efforts to kerosene and gasoline, Standard would have worn us out", C.C. later recalled.

Another problem C.C. faced was a steady supply of crude and other supplies from independent refineries as they were subject to hard competition from the "Big Company". C.C. was soon approached by a group of men seeking investment for drilling crude in Eastern Ky. One of the men was aLouisville attorney, James R. Duffin. He also had a "reputation". Although quite hesitant, C.C. saw the opportunity to secure oil with which to start a refinery and consented to join in. Duffin clearly had other plans, as he arranged for a merger of Stoll Oil and Old Dominion Oil Co, perhaps others. C.C. would have no part of this and after a lengthy lawsuit, relations with the group was severed. The end of this "investment" was inevitable and many people lost money including C.C. So other sources were contracted with through various pipelines. With railcar shipments and pipelines, Stoll Oil was being served well enough to plan for a new refinery.

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Gary Drye
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From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
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posted 09-01-2005 04:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
To be continued. Some problem with some website. "Page can not be display" message. Sorry

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Gary Drye
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Posts: 1208
From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 09-01-2005 07:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
STOLL REFINING CO.1918-1956

The early struggles of C.C. was about to be rewarded. In 1911, the Standard Oil Trust was broken up and new oil fields were being developed in close proximity to Louisville. A new refinery was constructed in 1918 and a pipeline from Hart County led directly into Louisville. It was at this time that C.C. incorporated the business and renamed it Stoll Refining Company. C.C. brought his four sons into the company after their military services and the company prospered. In 1924 Stoll Oil had ten gas stations in Louisville and fourt-four by 1941. Other stations were found throughout Kentucky, southern Indiana, and Ohio, together with a thousand other outlets where any number of the "96" products could be purchased. Many new products were brought to market like Stoll's original gasoline "Siver Tip" and "Golden Tip" gasoline.

It was a very vibrant company, with great personal attention to the welfare of employees and customers alike. C.C.'s Granddaughter, Martha Stoll Ballard, who was employed at the refinery's Main Office, recalls " ...as a young child we bought play gasoline for our bikes. The actual price then was 12 cents for a gallon of Golden Tip, 11 cents for Silver Tip." C.C. was also instrumental in the Founding of the United Refining Company in Warren PA. In 1943, C.C. passed away leaving his four sons to continue his dream.


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Gary Drye
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From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 09-01-2005 07:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
It was a very vibrant company, with great personal attention to the welfare of employees and customers alike. C.C.'s Granddaughter, Martha Stoll Ballard, who was employed at the refinery's Main Office, recalls " ...as a young child we bought play gasoline for our bikes. The actual price then was 12 cents for a gallon of Golden Tip, 11 cents for Silver Tip." C.C. was also instrumental in the Founding of the United Refining Company in Warren PA. In 1943, C.C. passed away leaving his four sons to continue his dream.

After WW2, Sinclair Oil Company set its sights on an immense expansion plan. Along with the well known Richfield Company, Stoll Refining was a target.In 1952 the Stoll Family sold the company to Sinclair Oil. Please note that there is a descrepency in all the reference books about a purchase date of 1948. Here is a quote from Martha Stoll Ballard, who was employed at the refinery's Main Office,."The date of 1952 will be forever remembered here, as I had to leave my husband studying for the finals for his MBA from the U of Michigan Business School, and fly to Louisville alone with my 6 month old son John, because I was needed for signing stockholder's papers with the rest of the Family, for the sale".
Sinclair Oil kept the name on the Louisville based products until 1956 when Stoll Oil disappeared from the Louisville city directory. From a recent conversation with Martha Stoll Ballard, "Sad to say, the Refinery is totally gone. Louisville has been on a long term project of waterfront renovation, and they may get that far. There is a large movement toward 'downtown living,' high rise condos, etc. River Road (our former address) still floods from time to time and has to be closed temporarily. It seems strange still, to ride down River Road -- or view it from the Interstate 'above' -- and not see those familiar tanks all over the area. Our location was on both sides of River Road, with the North side (the actual refinery) ending at the Ohio River's edge. We used to lie between the E.T. Slider Coal Company and Nugent Sand Company. Neither is there anymore, either. They have built a 'Great Lawn' from which people will soon be able to walk across the Ohio to Indiana by using the Big Four Bridge".
So has ended the dream of a truly remarkable man.


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Gary Drye
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From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
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posted 09-01-2005 07:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
Here is a list of Stoll's "96 Products" from 1939. Just about any item from this company is very collectible.

96 96


CATALOG PAGE 1
STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
INCORPORATED
OCTOBER 1939
SHELBY AND RIVER ROAD LOUISVILLE, KY

Established 1896, Stoll Oil Refining Co. now makes more than 96 products of Petroleum.
This Louisville Industry also makes many special materials for special needs.
If in this list of 96, you do not find the item you want, write or phone us about it.

VISCOYL MOTOR OIL - Our Premium brand for automobile motors. Made from high grade paraffin base crude, wax-pressed, and filtered thru fullers earth.
It is sold under the guarantee:
“Let us drain your crank case and refill with VISCOYL
If you are not satisfied we will refund your money.”

SAE 10 VISCOYL – Light.
SAE 20 VISCOYL – Light Medium.
SAE 30 VISCOYL – Medium.
SAE 40 VISCOYL – Heavy.
SAE 50 VISCOYL – Extra Heavy.
SAE 60 VISCOYL – Extra Heavy Tractor.
SAE 70 VISCOYL – Special Extra Heavy Tractor.

SAE 20 and 30 may also be used for Diesel Engines, 40 and 50 for Tractors,
50 and 60 for aeroplanes, and 60 for motorcycles.

VISCOYL TRANSMISSION LUBRICANTS - for transmission and differentials.
Transmission Oil, Gear Lubricant, and Transmission Grease are all made in three weights – Regular, Summer Heavy, and Winter Light. For best results, Transmission Lubricants should be changed in spring and fall, and proper weight put in. Summer Heavy is entirely too heavy for winter operation. If it is not changed in the fall, a little light lubricating oil should be added.
General Recommendations are:
Regular: Summer use in cars and winter in trucks.
Summer Heavy: Summer use in trucks.
Winter Light: Winter use in cars.

8. VISCOYL Transmission Oil - Winter Light - 90
9. VISCOYL Transmission Oil - Regular - 140
10. VISCOYL Transmission Oil - Summer Heavy - 250
11. E. P. Lubricant - 90
12. E. P. Lubricant - 140
13. Hypoid Lubricant - 90
14. Ford Spring Oil - made to special specifications for this purpose.
96 96


CATALOG PAGE 2
STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
INCORPORATED
OCTOBER 1939
SHELBY AND RIVER ROAD LOUISVILLE, KY

GREASES

The quality of grease depends upon the quality of oils and other materials from which it is made. All Stoll Greases are made to be quality companions to VISCOYL MOTOR OIL.
High grade raw materials and careful workmanship combine to produce lubricants of merit. Stoll Greases contain no filler.

15. No. 0 VISCOYL Cup Grease - semi – solid.

16. No. 1 VISCOYL Cup Grease – very soft.

17. No. 1 ½ VISCOYL Cup Grease – soft.

18. No. 2 VISCOYL Cup Grease - light medium. Suitable for Pressure Guns, Ball and Roller Bearings.
19. No. 3 VISCOYL Cup Grease - medium. For compression cups. (#2 and #3 are popular general purpose greases, and are often made to do service on almost every grease purpose.)
20. No. 4 VISCOYL Cup Grease - hard. For Heavy duty work and for bearing in warm surroundings, and for shackles where there is extreme weight, such as hearse and heavy truck shackles.
21. No. 5 VISCOYL Cup Grease - For high temperatures and heavy duty bearings. Insoluble in water.
22. VISCOYL Pressure Gun Grease - Best grease for general chassis lubrication. Prepared with fine lubricating oil. Moisture resisting. Will not clog fittings.
23. SHACK – A – LUBE Gun Grease – A translucent grease for winter chassis lubrication. This grade frequently sold by competition as a high priced specialty good.
24. Wheel Bearing Grease - A long wearing grease that does not track nor throw out of bearings on to brake bands.
25. Lead Grease – used especially in worn steering columns. Reduces excessive wear and noise.
26. Universal Joint Grease - A stringy adhesive grease, for automotive joints and industrial equipment. Will not wipe away from center of joint at high speed.
27. Extreme Pressure Grease - For some late model trucks and cars, and hypoid gears where bearing surfaces are subjected to extreme pressure.
96 96


CATALOG PAGE 3
STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
INCORPORATED
OCTOBER 1939
SHELBY AND RIVER ROAD LOUISVILLE, KY

GREASES

28. Water Pump Grease - Insoluble in water. Highly resistant to washing effects of warm water through cooling system. Should be used in all cars where grease come in contact with water.
29. Sponge Grease - Heavy fibrous grease for many special purposes.

30. Fiber Grease - Heavy fibrous grease for many special purposes.

31. Steering Grease - Special lead grease for steering post worm gear.

32. Daniel Boone Axle Grease - For wagon and buggy axles. Extra long wearing.

33. Jack Post Grease - For pump jacks, lines, and jack posts in oil fields.

34. Caterpillar Tractor Roller Grease - For roller bearings in tracks of Caterpillar tractors.

35. Graphite Grease - Very effective where lubricant is likely to be washed away, as on marine equipment and elevator shafts. Builds up film that reduces excess wear.

36. Curve Grease - Cheap grease for track curves or rough machinery.


96 96


CATALOG PAGE 4
STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
INCORPORATED
OCTOBER 1939
SHELBY AND RIVER ROAD LOUISVILLE, KY


DANIEL BOONE MOTOR OIL - Our second grade motor oil - is sold retain under the guarantee:

“Let us drain your crank case and refill with VISCOYL
If you are not satisfied we will refund your money.”

It is made from excellent materials and to excellent specifications.
It is used by large fleet owners as well as by smaller ones.

SAE 10 DANIEL BOONE Motor Oil - Light.
SAE 20 DANIEL BOONE Motor Oil - Light Medium.
SAE 30 DANIEL BOONE Motor Oil - Medium.
SAE 40 DANIEL BOONE Motor Oil - Heavy.
SAE 50 DANIEL BOONE Motor Oil - Extra Heavy.
SAE 60 DANIEL BOONE Motor Oil - Extra Heavy Tractor.
SAE 70 DANIEL BOONE Motor Oil - Special Extra Heavy Tractor.


NEUTRALS - Paraffin base, wax pressed, and filtered thru fullers earth.
Good color, good cold test.

MAMMOTH MOTOR OIL - the big value - is made to be the highest grade we can possibly develop at a low price. It is not equal in tests to VISCOYL or
DANIEL BOONE, but its tests are good, and at its price it is a remarkable bargain.

SAE 10 NEPTUNE Motor Oil - Light.
SAE 20 NEPTUNE Motor Oil - Light Medium.
SAE 30 NEPTUNE Motor Oil - Medium.
SAE 40 NEPTUNE Motor Oil - Heavy.
SAE 50 NEPTUNE Motor Oil - Extra Heavy.
SAE 60 NEPTUNE Motor Oil - Extra Heavy Tractor.
SAE 70 NEPTUNE Motor Oil - Special Extra Heavy Tractor.


96 96


CATALOG PAGE 5
STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
INCORPORATED
OCTOBER 1939
SHELBY AND RIVER ROAD LOUISVILLE, KY

ENGINE AND DYNAMO OILS:

Premium Gas Engine Oil - For stationary gas and gasoline engines.
Cascade Engine Oil - Light. High Speed – Filtering – Especially for Skinner Engines.
Clarion Engine Oil - Medium. Our most popular general oil for engine, shafting, and all around machine and shop use. Its good flash and fire make it able to meet requirements often considered to need much more expensive oil.
Starling Engine Oil - Heavy. A general purpose oil for engines and shaftings where heat or pressure makes a heavier oil desirable.
Starling Harvester Oil - Very Heavy. For thrashing machinery, farm machinery, etc., where a long lasting, good-bodied oil is required.
Royal Separator Oil - For cream separators.
Venus Dynamo Oil - For generators and motors, and other high speed purposes.
Saturn Turbine Oil - For steam turbines, high speed.
*Frigid Ice Machine Oil - A cold test oil for ice machinery or other purposes where low temperatures are encountered. Often called ammonia oil.

STEAM CYLINDER OILS:

64. Green Drop Mineral Steam Cylinder Oil - For moderate steam pressures.
65. Green Drop Compound Steam Cylinder Oil - For moderate pressures – wet steam.
66. Pacific Mineral Steam Cylinder Oil - For moderate steam pressures.
67. Pacific Compound Steam Cylinder Oil - For moderate pressures – wet steam.
68. *Improved Mineral Steam Cylinder Oil - For high pressures – dry steam.
69. *Improved Compound Steam Cylinder Oil - For high pressures.

96 96


CATALOG PAGE 6
STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
INCORPORATED
OCTOBER 1939
SHELBY AND RIVER ROAD LOUISVILLE, KY


MISCELLANEOUS LUBRICANTS:

70. Soluble Cutting Oil - For mixing with water. Usually mix one part oil to four parts water for cutting compound.
71. Regular Thread Cutting Oil - To be used straight.
72. Coal Spray Oil - For spraying coal to keep dust down. Comes in various weights. Usually sold in tank cars.
73. Spick and Span Floor Oil - For dressing floors. Apply with oiler or mop. When desired, can be scented at slight extra cost.
74. Faultless Form Oil - For concrete forms.
75. Paramount Paraffin Oil - Sometimes called non-viscous neutral. Meets many industrial and manufacturing purposes.
76. Snowbank Paraffin Wax - For electric insulation, and in textile industries, etc.
77. Raven Black Oil - A general purpose, common machinery oil.
78. Jupiter Crusher Oil - Heavy and high fire test. For rock crushers and other high pressure and severe work.
79. Speedee Spindle Oil - Light high speed, for cotton and woolen mills etc.
80. Zenith Rubbing Oil - For furniture furnishings, etc.
81. DZL Lub Oil - A lubricating oil for Diesel Engines.

*Articles marked with a star are not manufactured here, but are listed instead of products of less demand.

96 96


CATALOG PAGE 7
STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
INCORPORATED
OCTOBER 1939
SHELBY AND RIVER ROAD LOUISVILLE, KY


DIESEL PRODUCTS:

81. DZL Lub Oil - A lubricating oil for Diesel Engines.

82. Mars Diesel Fuel - A fuel for Diesel Engines.

83. Bay Horse Fuel - A fuel for Diesel Engines.


FUEL OILS:

84. Black Cat Fuel Oil - Heavy Industrial.

85. Black Bear Fuel Oil - Medium Industrial.


FURNACE OILS:

86. Liquid Heat Furnace Oil - For domestic burners.

87. Kwik Fyr Furnace Oil - Light - for small burners.


SOLVENTS:

88. Sunbeam Solvent - For cleaners.

89. Star Mineral Spirits - A heavy solvent for paint makers.

90. Lacquer Diluent - Lightest solvent for paint makers.


TRACTOR FUEL:

Yellow Mule Tractor Fuel.


96 96


CATALOG PAGE 8
STOLL OIL REFINING CO.
INCORPORATED
OCTOBER 1939
SHELBY AND RIVER ROAD LOUISVILLE, KY


KEROSENE:

92. Daylitene Lamp Oil - Highest Grade lamp oil.

GASOLINE:

93. Ethyl Gasoline - Highest Anti – Knock.

94. Silver Tip Gasoline - (Leaded) “Gives Wings To Your Car”

95. Clear Tip Gasoline - (No Lead)

96. Golden Tip Gasoline - Quick Start - less drain on battery -
Complete explosion - reduces crank case diluting.
High anti – knock.


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BudE
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From: Beecher,Illinois,USA
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posted 09-04-2005 09:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BudE   Click Here to Email BudE     Edit/Delete Message
Just want to say a big THANKS for this past hour of some of the most interesting and enlighting reading I'm sure I'll see this week. I come from a Sinclair family where the governments "interference" in both the Standard Oil trust and the breakup of Sinclair/ARCO were considered politicly motivated,unfair,etc. Now I can begin to see "the rest of the story" as Paul Harvey says. You are doing a great job with this COTM. Many thanks.

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Gary Drye
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From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 09-08-2005 03:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
INTERESTING TIDBITS

Stoll Refining Company put out a corporate newsletter, called "Golden Tips" that was full of personal and business news, product selling tips, and safety, along with witty sayings. Here are a couple of interesting facts I came across.

Golden Tips No. 433 April 23, 1946
"Ethyl may not now be made above 80 octane. This new government requirement has come because of lead shortages".

Many of you, especially the pump collectors have come across this quite frequently. A person will tell you, "I remember...or I saw...one of those old pumps that you pump the gas up into the globe". I either ignored their mistake or corrected them on the subject. I would explain the gasoline was pumped into a glass "cylinder" and the "globe" was an advertising piece on the very top of the pump. Seems I may have been the one wrong.


Golden Tips No. 460 June 24, 1947
"Dealers who use visible pumps should be careful to keep the visible globes empty in the middle of the hot sun-shiny days. Bright sunshine on the globes tends both to cause the dealer to run a slight shortage and also to hurt the octane of the gasoline.
This is not so important in the early morning or late afternoon, or on shaded pumps, but the danger is that a fellow will pump it up in the morning, and leave it there all day."


Notice the "jeweled" globe bodies on the pumps!!! Don't think this company didn't have CLASS!!!

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Gary Drye
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From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
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posted 09-08-2005 04:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
An early can from the Chas. C. Company

One of the "96" products.

[This message has been edited by Gary Drye (edited 09-08-2005).]

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Gary Drye
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posted 09-08-2005 04:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
This plate was a "give away" and pictured the refinery.

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Gary Drye
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posted 09-10-2005 07:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
VISCOYL MOTOR OIL

Viscoyl oil was one of the major "96" products produced at the refinery. It was highly praised for its viscosity and quality. Being a "premium" oil, it was also priced at or below the competition's lower grades.

This is the VISCOYL Guarantee:
"Let us drain your crankcase and refill with VISCOYL.
If you are not satisfied, we will refund your money".

To reduce costs and retain consumer confidence on the products they purchased, VISCOYL will not be found in a "refinery sealed" quart can. It was only sold in bulk.

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Gary Drye
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From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
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posted 09-10-2005 07:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
An early gas station... I will be inserting some wonderful old station images over the month. If you can, try to take them and make them larger. There are some fantastic items to be seen. Check out those visible pumps and globes!!!

Many "new discoveries" from these pictures will be appearing in an upcoming issue of "Petroleum Collectibles" magazine.

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Gary Drye
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posted 09-10-2005 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
BEAUTIFUL Viscoyl sign.

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Kysoilman
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From: Owenton, KY U.S.A.
Registered: Apr 2001

posted 09-10-2005 11:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kysoilman   Click Here to Email Kysoilman     Edit/Delete Message
STOLL ITEMS ARE VERY HARD TO FIND THE ABOVE 26" PORCELAIN SIGN WAS FOUND BY BOBBY HARPER HE HAD IT RESTORED AND SOLD IT TO ME........AS I RECALL BOBBY SAID "REX I DON'T BELIEVE YOU WOULD OF RESTORED THE SIGN IT LOOKED GOOD" HE WAS RITE.
...............
REX LIKES STOLL
LOOKING FORWARD TO MORE

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Gary Drye
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From: Clarksville, Tn. USA
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posted 09-11-2005 08:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gary Drye   Click Here to Email Gary Drye     Edit/Delete Message
Not as impressive as some upcoming pictures, but still a nice image of some visible pumps.

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